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Faculty in Education, Geek, Working to Close Digital and Social Divides

 

Organizing Information

2 min read

These are two related ways to organize the fast amount of information available to us on the internet.

RSS 

RSS feeds bring content that we subscribe to directly to us without us having to to sites to see if there is new content.  I can subscribe to blogs, hashtags on Twitter, key word searches in newspapers, other content where the owner has ensured that the site will have a "feed" that pushes content to readers.

 

This is a somewhat dated but still good explanation.

  

I use Feedly for my personal /professional RSS feed reader. 

I use Inoreader (with a paid upgrade) to create the aggregated feed for our blogs on our course website.  

 

Social Bookmarking

Rather than book mark interesting sites to my computer or browser, I use a "social bookmarking site.  The two best known are Diigo and Del.icio.us.   With each, I have a tool installed in my browswers and on my mobile devices.  if I want to save something, I click on that tool, save the site, and -- importantly -- tag it.

 

Here's an example:  On twitter, someone posted a link to a new video site.  I opened it, wanted to save it, so opened the diigo toolbar tool and tagged it.  It looked like this:

 

screen shot of diigo toolbar tool

My bookmarks are all then "in the cloud", where I can access them on any device.

 

I can also search by my tags.

 

I can also create a RSS feed for any tag.  Our Class Resources page is filled with RSS feeds for tags in my Diigo.

 

And :  You notice that I also tagged this site 566 (as well as "video").  When I want something to appear in the optional reading part of our syllabus home page, I tag it 566, and it goes to the rss feed I have set up on the syllabus.

 

Both these tools work well to help manage the firehose of information on the web. 

 

 

 

Social Bookmarking and RSS Feeds

2 min read

These are two related ways to organize the fast amount of information available to us on the internet.

RSS 

RSS feeds bring content that we subscribe to directly to us without us having to to sites to see if there is new content.  I can subscribe to blogs, hashtags on Twitter, key word searches in newspapers, other content where the owner has ensured that the site will have a "feed" that pushes content to readers.

 

This is a somewhat dated but still good explanation.

  

I use Feedly for my personal /professional RSS feed reader. 

I use Inoreader (with a paid upgrade) to create the aggregated feed for our blogs on our course website.  

 

Social Bookmarking

Rather than book mark interesting sites to my computer or browser, I use a "social bookmarking site.  The two best known are Diigo and Del.icio.us.   With each, I have a tool installed in my browswers and on my mobile devices.  if I want to save something, I click on that tool, save the site, and -- importantly -- tag it.

 

Here's an example:  On twitter, someone posted a link to a new video site.  I opened it, wanted to save it, so opened the diigo toolbar tool and tagged it.  It looked like this:

 

screen shot of diigo toolbar tool

My bookmarks are all then "in the cloud", where I can access them on any device.

 

I can also search by my tags.

 

I can also create a RSS feed for any tag.  Our Class Resources page is filled with RSS feeds for tags in my Diigo.

 

And :  You notice that I also tagged this site 566 (as well as "video").  When I want something to appear in the optional reading part of our syllabus home page, I tag it 566, and it goes to the rss feed I have set up on the syllabus.

 

Both these tools work well to help manage the firehose of information on the web. 

 

 

 

Welcome to our Curation Site

1 min read

On this site, we'll share our critical reviews of tools and resources for supporting learning with digital integration.  

 

See directions on the Projects page on our syllabus.

 

You can add links.

 

And formatting.

 

And upload images.

keyboard with a serious play key 

 

and if we tag our posts, we can easily find common threads through the site.  Unlike Instagram, the point in tagging here is to use common, not creative tags.   

 

 

Welcome to our Curation Site

1 min read

On this site, we'll share our critical reviews of tools and resources for supporting learning with digital integration.  

 

See directions on the Projects page on our syllabus.

 

You can add links.

 

And formatting.

 

And upload images.

keyboard with a serious play key 

 

and if we tag our posts, we can easily find common threads through the site.  Unlike Instagram, the point in tagging here is to use common, not creative tags.   

 

 

Diigo

2 min read

I use Diigo to bookmark  in the "cloud" and organize websites I come across as I read, follow people on Twitter, or read blogs.  Organization is done by tagging - -adding descriptive workds to bookmarks.  Many of the links to materials in our course are my bookmarks tagged by a particular topic.  As you can see,  bookmarks can easily be shared with others.

You can also set up a RSS feed (I've done this on our wiki webpages) so that those pages are updated anytime I add a new bookmark to a tag. This is also how the "who's writing" widget works on the front page of our course website. 

 

Diigo allows you to install a tool in your browser so that bookmarking is easily done with just a few clicks.  

 

I can also connect my Twitter and Diigo accounts so that my favorite Tweets are saved to Diigo.


And finally, Diigo also allows me to connect with my blog by setting up a tag unique to the blog.  If I read an article that I want to post to my blog, I tag it with that distinctive tag and a short time later, a link to my article along with any text i've highlighted or comments I've made are publised on the blog.

I'd recommend this article on using Diigo in the classroom as an overview.

 

 

Welcome to Our Shared Site

1 min read

On this site, we'll share our reviews of tools for learning and teaching.